I’m lucky enough to come from a large and very close family, so I’ve got mostly fantastic memories of my childhood. Growing up in Bradford, a town in the north of England, was interesting and sometimes a bit of a challenge. It’s a great area, and the sense of community and family is very strong there. When I was a kid, though, there were quite a few new families arriving and some moving on too, so the community was changing fairly rapidly. This had an impact on me simply because I’m mixed race. As a really young kid, it never crossed my mind that being Irish/English/Asian might cause some people an issue - I was just having a great time playing with my three sisters and friends. But as I got older, a few kids started asking questions, and that’s when I began to realise that some of them thought I was - how can I put it? - different. Kids always like to put things in a category - it’s just a part of childhood and growing up in a way, because it helps them understand stuff that’s around them. It’s not a bad thing. It’s just the way kids are. Kids are inquisitive. That’s fine when you’re at school and someone’s asking you which football team you support or what bands you’re into, but when I started to get a little older and joined in with various social groups at school, some of the kids started asking me questions that I just didn’t understand. ‘Where are your parents from?’ or ‘Where are you from?’ as well as ‘Why is your mum white and your dad brown?’ I can honestly say that when they asked that last one it had never even crossed my mind before, so I didn’t actually know what to say in reply. I was confused. Not confused about who I was and what was important to me but about why these kids were even interested in this stuff in the first place. I couldn’t understand why it had any relevance. It was baffling. I just thought, Why do you find that so interesting? What does it matter to you? My mum’s my mum and dad’s my dad.
zayn malik, who we are autobiography (via intoxicatemezm)

m-arkiplier:

Instead of insane, say unreal.

Instead of crazy, say unbelievable.

Instead of calling someone a psycho, call them an asshole.

Instead of stupid, say awful.

Instead of dumb, say bad.

Taking ableist language out of your vocabulary is simple and will help widen your…

elizabethbarber:

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Have you ever called a friend or family member while walking alone just so “someone will know where you are”? Have you ever told someone, “Let me know when you get home”?

Safety is always a big concern and now you can easily turn your mobile devices into digital lifelines.

3 apps to…

smolderingtroyler:

heartyglobe:

nobody says it but we all know what this is about

This picture is weirdly genius

smolderingtroyler:

heartyglobe:

nobody says it but we all know what this is about

This picture is weirdly genius

morphosyntax:

See, that is another reason why ill never think fetishization is harmless. Like sure, “latinas are so hot!” might look like a nice, positive stereotype on the surface, but look at the consequences of said stereotype, the sexual tourism industry it has created and sustained with the money of white gringos coming to my country looking for a spicy latina wife.

Fetishization is profoundly dehumanizing and no one will ever convince me otherwise.

Many women, I think, resist feminism because it is an agony to be fully conscious of the brutal misogyny which permeates culture, society, and all personal relationships.
Andrea Dworkin, Our Blood: Prophecies and Discourses on Sexual Politics (via staininyourbrain)
rookiemag:

yayfeminism:

Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

this is important.xxlaia.

rookiemag:

yayfeminism:

Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

this is important.

xx
laia.

floozys:

the most fucked up thing is that

emma watson

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made

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one of the most

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men inclusive

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feminist speeches

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i’ve heard in the longest time, and the result? the result from these men who claim that they would be all for feminism if it weren’t for all “the man…

geekscoutcookies:

thewholockgames:

pocketostars:

taeyeon-9muses-rilakkuma-ohyeah:

Clever way of getting his features in there

cr:  thqys

Utilizing the critical thinking skills and greater levels of maturity assumed by my college degree, I deduced that I could make butt pancakes.

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i wasnt gonna reblogg but then

buttcakes

My anaconda do

Anything you want in love you should have. If you want someone to send you flowers just because it’s Tuesday, you should have that. If you want someone to write you love letters, you should have that. If you want someone who looks at you like the sun rises and sets because of you, you should have that. In life, we often have to settle for “okay” or “good enough”, love should not be one of those things.
c.h.dixon (via kushandwizdom)

Good Vibes HERE

(via words-of-emotion)
We are concerned that by isolating homosexuality as the main and most troubling target of the Israeli intelligence apparatus, as recently disclosed, one is ignoring the comprehensive stranglehold that this militarized colonial regime has on the lives and privacy of Palestinians throughout the occupied country.
Blackmailing and extorting an individual on the basis of their sexuality for mainstream LGBT rights framing is a seriously damning act of totalitarian oppression. Concentrating on this alone, however, does allow recognition of a hierarchy of priorities in which Palestinians are expected to acquiesce unquestioningly. Indeed sexuality in its totality (including and not just limited to homosexuality) in Palestine is socially, politically and psychologically significant – but only the symptom of a much larger cancer. It cannot be singled out as a supreme priority vis-a-vis access to healthcare, disruption of freedom of movement, bribery, exposure of marital infidelities, financial blackmail, drug use or any other form of extortion. All eventually amount to systematic and premeditated violence.
The danger in singling out homosexuality only strengthens narratives of pinkwashing, where one could only exist as a secret homosexual person in Palestine, always worried about his/her/their outing, and having to look to Israel as the all-powerful and all-knowing entity capable of making or unmaking that life. Falling prey to this logic only entrenches a false binary that actively frames Palestine and Palestinians as homophobic versus Israel and Israelis as sexually tolerant and liberal. We notice, and are dismayed and worried, that some critiques of, and approaches towards, this revelation practices by the Israeli Intelligence Unit 8200, have a disappointed tone of voice, as if trying to say, ‘Behave Israel, we know you are better than this.’ This is only misleading. The fact is that Israel is a totalitarian military colonial power that has no good intention towards any Palestinian lives it controls and such practices of entrapment are central to (even constitutive of) the fabric of the Israeli Military state.
Israeli Military intelligence is well aware that by using sexuality as tool of extortion and entrapment, it also strengthens this fabricated link between non-heteronormative sexualities, practices and identities and Israeli Colonial Oppression in the eyes of the general Palestinian people. The linking of sexuality with Palestinian collaborators has become a word and a subjectivity of its own in the Palestinian imaginary and reality known as isqatat. In our struggle, we are constantly seeking to dismantle and resist this oppressive stereotype. Therefore, simplistic and reductionist approaches to sexuality in Palestine and Israeli oppression, although intentionally seeking to expose Zionist Israel, unwittingly facilitate this discourse, rather than disrupting pinkwashing. In other words, Israel is interested in portraying Palestinian sexuality in any form that transgresses the confines of the heteronormative institution (conventional marriage), as being in some form linked to Israel. In the case of there being any positive progress in the Palestinian sexual movement, Israel will rush to take the credit. Should there be any regression, Israel will still make use of the situation by stigmatizing and exploiting Palestinians and coming out as the only protagonist for sexual rights and tolerance. All in all, Zionism is the only winner in such dialectics.

It’s hard to articulate how I feel. I hope none of you lives to see his/her country being bombed. I hope those celebrating that my (and their) country is being bombed realize that ISIS has been evacuating its headquarters in Raqqa for the last several days, that many civilians live in ISIS-held territories, and that the US has a pitiful track record when it comes to civilian casualties, i.e. collateral damage.

ISIS is the enemy, but so is Assad. If the US and its allies hadn’t refused to bomb Assad a year ago, or arm the rebels two years ago, or establish a no-fly zone and humanitarian corridors three years ago, the ISIS threat would be non-existent.

So no, those bombing ISIS are not our heroes, nor will they ever be our saviors.

my friend on U.S. airstrikes in Syria (via qasaweh)

qillatadab:

My heart is with my Syrian friends and their families and the amazing people of Syria. May you know peace and healing soon and may you build your world anew. My solidarity doesn’t matter or make a difference. I just want this nightmare to stop. I love you and I believe in you.

sarajxne:

that shitty feeling when you wanna go out & be social, but once you’re out, all you wanna do is be back at home